Dan Romm

An Important Detail

Consider the following deal:

W
Dummy
A106
AK4
AK5
AQ86
 
E
You
KJ
Q762
QJ10
KJ73

Bidding: you open 1NT (12-14), partner bids 5NT and you decide to bid seven based on the fact that you have two four card suits, the 10 of diamonds and an optimistic nature.

Opening lead: 4 of clubs. You play the 6 from dummy, RHO plays the 10 and you win the Jack.

Analysis: the contract has a good chance. You need a 3-3 heart split, a successful guess as to the location of the spade Queen, or a defensive mistake. The play seems straightforward: begin by running clubs so as to force a discard (or discards) that may be helpful; cash three rounds of hearts hoping your long heart sets up; and, if not, decide which way to finesse the spade (the distribution of hearts and clubs in the opponents’ hands may provide a clue). But, there is more to the hand! What is it?

Solution: the key detail to the correct play of the hand is the order in which you cash your clubs! You must win the second club in dummy (in order to preserve a choice as to where to win the third club) and carefully observe what club LHO plays. Noting whether it’s higher or lower than the 4 will tell you if he started with two clubs or more than two. If two, you must win the third club in your hand; otherwise you must win the third club in dummy! Why? So that on the fourth club the hand short in clubs is forced to discard before his partner.

Illustration: if either opponent holds three spades including the Queen, four hearts without the Jack, four diamonds without the Jack and two clubs, then his partner can hold at most one Jack (if he holds none the hand is cold unless declarer has three or more spades). A spade pitch on the third club can’t hurt. But the only pitch on the fourth club that is certain not to cost a trick, no matter what declarer’s distribution is, is from the red suit in which partner does not hold the Jack! – an unsolvable dilemma unless the clubs have been played in the wrong order, in which case his partner can reveal that the safe pitch is a diamond by discarding his lowest diamond. The recommended line of play gives the defender a 50% chance of guessing wrong as opposed to a 100% chance of guessing right. This is a significant increase in your odds of making the contract and should not be squandered – especially in a grand slam!


5 Comments

GoogleJuly 9th, 2014 at 3:49 am

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David WarheitJuly 23rd, 2014 at 7:32 pm

1. You don’t have the 10 of clubs; you do have the 10 of diamonds.
2. If you do decide to accept the invitation to bid 7, you absolutely should bid 7C (bid your suits up the line). Note that 7C is vastly better than 7N.
3. I never would have opened the E hand (1 quick trick, no aces, KJ doubleton of spades, only 12 HCP; the only plus is the D10). Obviously W had played with his partner before. If I had been his partner, he would have sailed into 7 with no problem, since he would know I wouldn’t have opened the bidding with this bad a hand.

Dan RommJuly 24th, 2014 at 1:16 am

Thanks for the feedback David, but I don’t think you are looking at the hand presented. First, opener has 13 HCP, not 12. Second, nowhere does the article imply that declarer has the ten of clubs. Third, your comment about the bidding has some merit, but is incidental as to the main lesson of the hand

Dan RommJuly 24th, 2014 at 1:19 am

Oops, the bidding does say the ten of clubs. This is an error caused by reediting. It should say the ten of diamonds. I will make the correction.

TadayasuDecember 13th, 2015 at 10:35 pm

I love A Handmaid’s Tale. One thing of my favorite aceptss of the book was how unexpected little nuances were. ( not sure if these are spoilers, so viewer beware )For example, the Handmaid’ society seems to have generated from either the cultures of the US and/or Canada. I assumed that whatever caused this semi-Taliban society to arise, occurred all over the world and not just in North America. However, I was shocked when people from an Asian culture visited the Handmaid society and not only were they more sexually liberated than the Handmaid society, but they were also depicted as more sexually liberated and free than their modern day counterpart. Such events as this caused me to reexamine certain assumptions about the longevity of a culture typically portrayed as surviving where others will not. It was refreshing in many ways and, for me, believeable but strange.

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